Digestive Health Center

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Medications

Actigall

  • Generic Name: ursodiol
  • Uses: Ursodiol is taken to dissolve cholesterol gallstones; to prevent gallstone formation during rapid weight loss; and to treat primary biliary cirrhosis
  • Food-Drug Interaction: None. May take on empty stomach or with food to prevent stomach upset.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to bile salts, or if taking birth control pills, estrogens or Atromid, or if you have chronic liver disease. Do not take with antacids that contain aluminum (Maalox, Mylanta), with Questran (cholestyranamine) or Colestid (colestipol). Report for blood tests as directed.
  • Side Effects: Mild diarrhea, nausea, metallic taste, constipation, rash, headache, muscle aches.

Amoxicillin

  • Generic Name: amoxicillin
  • Uses: This drug is an antibiotic that kills bacteria and clears up infection within the body.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or without food. Take full prescribed course. Liquids: shake well, keep cold. If pregnant planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have any allergies, especially to penicillin or similar antibiotics; or if taking any other antibiotics, allopurinol (Zyloprim), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, or probenecid (Benemid); or if you have impaired kidneys. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, vomiting, skin rash, hives, itching. Rare or serious reactions: difficult breathing, wheezing, severe diarrhea, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising.


Amoxil

  • Generic Name: amoxicillin
  • Uses: This drug is an antibiotic that kills bacteria and clears up infection within the body.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or without food. Take full prescribed course. Liquids: shake well, keep cold. If pregnant planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have any allergies, especially to penicillin or similar antibiotics; or if taking any other antibiotics, allopurinol (Zyloprim), atenolol (Tenormin), oral contraceptives, or probenecid (Benemid); or if you have impaired kidneys. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, vomiting, skin rash, hives, itching. Rare or serious reactions: difficult breathing, wheezing, severe diarrhea, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising.

Anusol

  • Generic Name: bismuth, hydrocortisone and zinc oxide
  • Uses: Relief of pain and itching due to hemorrhoids or fissures.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: None. For rectal use only. Use as directed.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if your symptoms increase or anal pain, itching or discharge occur.
  • Side Effects: Burning, itching, bleeding or skin irritation not present prior to treatment with this medication.

Asacol

  • Generic Name: mesalamine
  • Uses: Treatment of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and proctitis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Swallow tablet whole. Do not break outer covering. May take with or without food. The effect during pregnancy is not known.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to mesalamine or salicylates; or if you have chronic kidney disease. In a few patients may aggravate abdominal cramping, diarrhea or blood in stool. Notify physician. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: abdominal cramps or indigestion, nausea, bloating, diarrhea, headache, increase, dizziness, rash. Rare or serious reactions: fever, severe headache, increased blood in stool.

Aspirin

  • Generic Name: aspirin
  • Uses: Relief of mild to moderate pain. Prevention of recurrent heart attack.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food, milk, or full glass of water to prevent stomach upset. Take exact dose prescribed. Use alcohol cautiously (stomach irritation). Long term, heavy use may result in iron deficiency. Use iron rich foods.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to aspirin-like drugs; or taking antacids, a blood thinner (Coumadin), aspirin substitutes, cortisone, Diamox, drugs for diabetes or gout, methotrexate, or large doses of vitamin C; or if you have anemia, asthma, a bone marrow or bleeding disorder, peptic ulcer disease, or impaired liver or kidneys. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.

Axid

  • Generic Name: nizatidine
  • Uses: Treatment or prevention of peptic ulcer and related acid conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food for increased blood absorption. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) and alcohol increase stomach acid secretion and may worsen ulcer/acid condition. Long-term use may result in iron deficiency. Use iron rich foods.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to nizatidine or H2 blocker ulcer medicine; or if you have kidney disease or a liver disorder. Aspirin (salicylates) aggravates acid-ulcer conditions-avoid! Do not use for minor indigestive symptoms. Consult physician before stopping drug. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medications.
  • Side Effects: drowsiness, sweating, rash, hives, palpitations of heart.

Azulfidine

  • Generic Name: sulfasalazine
  • Uses: Treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food/milk to prevent stomach upset or loss of appetite. May take on empty stomach. Maintain good urine flow by drinking two quarts of liquid daily. Long-term use lower blood folic acid (folacen) level. Use foods rich in folic acid or vitamin supplement.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to aspirin or "sulfa" drugs, if taking a blood thinner ( anticoagulant), pills for diabetes, Dilantin, digoxin, mandelamine or methotrexate, or if you have a blood cell disorder, porphyria or impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if dizziness occurs. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Report for tests as directed. With surgery, alert physician about drug.
  • Side Effects: Severe skin reaction, joint or muscle pains, bloody urine, reduced sperm count, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, yellow liver jaundice. Headache, dizziness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, orange coloration of urine no significance).

Benadryl

  • Generic Name: diphenhydramine
  • Uses: Treatment of allergic conditions, insomnia, motion sickness and parkinsonism.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food to prevent stomach upset. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola) decreases sedative effect. Use alcohol cautiously until combined effect is known.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic or overly sensitive to antihistamines; or if you are taking other drugs with sedative effects or a mono-amineoxidase (MAO) inhibitor drug (ask physician); or if you have asthma, glaucoma, peptic ulcer, enlarges prostate gland, or impaired kidney function. Avoid while breast-feeding an infant. Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness or blurred vision occurs. Avoid excessive sun and use of ultraviolet lamps until skin sensitivity is known.
  • Side Effects: Drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, dryness of nose and throat, difficult urination, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: unusual fatigue or weakness, fever, severe sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising.

Bentyl

  • Generic Name: dicyclomine
  • Uses: Treatment of intestinal cramps and irritable bowel.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take 30 to 60 minutes before eating to obtain best results. Using foods rich in fiber and bran can usually prevent constipation.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are taking sedatives, antacids, antidepressants or major tranquilizers, or if you have glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, prostate gland enlargement, ulcerative colitis or an impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Side Effects: Difficult urination, constipation, headache, drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, skin rash.

Biaxin

  • Generic Name: clarithromycin
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with food or on an empty stomach. Take full prescribed course. Keep this and all medications out of the reach of children.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to clarithromycin or erythromycin; or if taking carbamazepine (Tegretol) or theophylline (Theo-Dur); or if you have severe chronic kidney or liver disease, or ulcer colitis. This drug is related to erythromycin so an interaction of the following drugs is possible: blood thinners (Coumadin), phenytoin (Dilantin), pimozide (Orap), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), diazepam (Valium) or digoxin (Lanoxin). Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Diarrhea, nausea, abnormal taste, abdominal discomfort, indigestion, headache. Rare or serious reactions: rapid heart rate.

Buspar

  • Generic Name: buspirone
  • Uses: Treatment of anxiety.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food if stomach upset occurs.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had problems with other sedative drugs, are taking digoxin (Lanoxin) or have chronic renal disease. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation). Do not drive or operate hazardous machinery until sedative effect is known.
  • Side Effects: Dizziness, headache, insomnia, nervousness, lightheadedness, nausea, non-specific chest pain, ringing in ears, nasal congestion.

Carafate

  • Generic Name: sucralfate
  • Uses: Treatment of duodenal ulcer.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best effect occurs when taken on empty stomach one hour before eating. Avoid antacids one hour before or after taking drug. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if taking antacids, cimetidine (Tagamet), digoxin (Lanoxin), phenytoin (Dilantin), tetracycline (Achromycin), blood thinners (Coumadin), or Vitamins A, D, E or K. Do not drive if dizziness or drowsiness occurs. Consult physician before stopping drug. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: dizziness, drowsiness, indigestion, nausea, stomach cramps, constipation, skin rash.

Cephulac

  • Generic Name: lactulose
  • Uses: Treatment of mental changes occurring with cirrhosis of the liver.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May be mixed with fruit juice, water or milk if desired. Store below 86 degrees Fahrenheit. Do not freeze. No food-drug interactions. Diarrhea side effect may improve with a diet high in fiber/bran.
  • Cautions: Notify physician if you have had a reaction to galactose or if you taking antacids, Neomycin or other antibiotics. Do not take laxatives as Cephulac has a laxative effect. Report for blood tests as instructed.
  • Side Effects: Severe weakness, faintness; belching, bloating, diarrhea, cramps, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting.

Cipro

  • Generic Name: ciprofloxacin
  • Uses: This drug is an antibiotic that kills bacteria and clears up infection within the body.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. Delayed but full absorption does occur with food. Do not take antacids as they block absorption. Use caution with alcohol and with driving or operating hazardous machinery until effect is known (dizziness, sedation).
  • Cautions: Not recommended for children or pregnant women. Notify physician if you have serious allergies; or are taking nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin), antacids, probenecid (Benemid), or theophylline (Theo-Dur) Keep this and all medications out of reach of children.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, headache, dizziness, rash, indigestion, drowsiness, constipation. Rare or serious reactions: fever, sore throat, visual disturbances.

Citrucel

  • Generic Name: methylcellulose
  • Uses: Treatment of chronic constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulosis hemorrhoids and some forms of diarrhea.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with a full glass of water one hour before or after any other medicine (may prevent drug absorption). The above conditions are often improved when a diet rich in fiber/bran is used.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to stool softeners or bulking agents, have any bowel condition or are taking any medications long term. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, mild-abdominal cramps, bloating, diarrhea, rumbling sounds. Rare or serious reactions: severe abdominal pain, vomiting.

Colace

  • Generic Name: docusate
  • Uses: Treatment of chronic constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulosis, hemorrhoids and some forms of diarrhea.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with a full glass of water at least one hour before or after any medicine (may prevent drug absorption). The above conditions are often improved when a diet in fiber/bran is used.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to stool softeners of bulking agents, have any bowel condition or are taking any medications long term. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, mild-abdominal cramps, bloating, diarrhea, rumbling sounds. Rare or serious reactions: severe abdominal pain, vomiting.

Colchicine

  • Generic Name: colchicine
  • Uses: Treatment and prevention of acute gout attacks. Prevention of acute attacks of familial Mediterranean fever.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Caffeine/tea decrease drug effect. Long-term use may cause some vitamin deficiencies. Use multiple vitamin supplements. For gout, avoid excessive purine rich foods and use foods that cause an alkaline urine.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have a blood cell or bone marrow disorder, heart disease, a stomach or intestinal disorder or impaired liver or kidneys. Avoid if pregnant. Use alcohol sparingly (increased uric acid). Report for tests as directed. Consult physician regarding onset of nausea, vomiting or diarrhea.
  • Side Effects: Hair loss, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, rash. Rare reactions: numbness or pain in hands or feet, bloody urine, reduced urine, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising.

Compazine

  • Generic Name: prochlorperazine
  • Uses: Control of nausea and vomiting
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola) decreases sedative effect. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to phenothiazine tranquilizers; or if taking sedatives drugs for epilepsy or high blood pressure, antispasmodics, beta-blockers (Inderal) phenytoin (Dilantin), antidepressants, or lithium (Lithobid), or if you have a bone marrow disorder, glaucoma, heart disease, asthma, liver or kidney disease, or an enlarged prostate gland. Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision occurs.
  • Side Effects: Dizziness, drowsiness, blurred vision, nasal congestion, fast heartbeat, constipation, altered menstrual pattern, difficult urination, and skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: muscle spasms, involuntary movements, tremors, fainting, fever, sore throat, yellow liver jaundice.

Cortenema

  • Generic Name: hydrocortisone
  • Uses: Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative proctitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's colitis).
  • Food-Drug Interaction: None. Follow package instructions carefully. Given by enema. With long-term use a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D will help to prevent calcium loss from body.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to steroids (cortisone) as some absorption does occur into the blood stream. Long-term use may result in steroid side effects (weight gain, facial swelling, and mood change).
  • Side Effects: Severe abdominal pain; anal discomfort or burning, increased rectal bleeding.

Cortifoam

  • Generic Name: hydrocortisone
  • Uses: Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative proctitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's colitis).
  • Food-Drug Interaction: None. Follow package instructions carefully. Given by enema. With long term use a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D will help to prevent calcium loss from body.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to steroids (cortisone) as some absorption does occur into the blood stream. Long-term use may result in steroid side effects (weight gain, facial swelling, and mood change).
  • Side Effects: Severe abdominal pain; anal discomfort or burning, increased rectal bleeding.

Cytotec

  • Generic Name: misoprostol
  • Uses: Prevention of stomach ulcers or inflammation.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on an empty stomach as food reduces absorption. Do not take with magnesium containing antacids. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to prostaglandins or misoprostol; or if you have kidney disease. Do not take if pregnant or planning pregnancy. May cause miscarriage. If pregnancy occurs, stop drug and contact physician. Use effective contraceptive measures during therapy.
  • Side Effects: Diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, nausea, bloating, vomiting, constipation, headache. Rare and serious reactions: vaginal bleeding, uterine cramps, and menstrual irregularity.

Dalmanel

  • Generic Name: flurazepam
  • Uses: Treatment of insomnia.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with food or on an empty stomach. May increase appetite. Caffeine may reduce sedative effect. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic to other tranquilizer drugs, or if you are taking other drugs with sedative effects; also if you are severely depressed or you have glaucoma, chronic lung disease, impaired liver or kidney function. Avoid chronic use during pregnancy or while breast-feeding an infant. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive if drowsiness or "hangover" effect occurs the day after use. Avoid alcohol completely.
  • Side Effects: Headache, daytime drowsiness, fatigue, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, unsteadiness, constipation, skin rash or itching. Rare reactions: Yellow liver jaundice, fever, and severe sore throat.

Deltasonel

  • Generic Name: prednisone
  • Uses: Relief of symptoms in certain allergic and inflammatory conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or without food. A diet low in salt (sodium) and high in potassium and protein is recommended. Long-term use may lower bone calcium, so high calcium foods and/or vitamin D-calcium supplements suggested.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had previous side effects from any cortisone drug, if taking aspirin, a blood thinner (anticoagulant), digitalis, diuretics or anti-diabetic pills, or if you have diabetes, glaucoma, heart disease, high blood pressure, impaired liver, myasthenia gravis, peptic ulcer disease or history of tuberculosis. Avoid during first 3 months of pregnancy and if breast-feeding. Use alcohol cautiously (stomach irritation). With surgery, alert physicians about drug. Consult a physician before stopping drug.
  • Side Effects: Weight gain, indigestion, nervousness, acne, skin rash, swelling of face; rare reactions: mental depression, unusual fatigue or weakness, blurred vision, stomach pain, bloody or black stools, infections, swelling of feet or ankles.

Desyrel

  • Generic Name: trazodone
  • Uses: Treatment of depression.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk to prevent stomach upset. Drug may increase appetite. May require up to 2 or 3 weeks obtaining full effect of drug. Transient drowsiness commonly occurs early in treatment. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation)
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to trazodone; or if taking other antidepressants, Phenobarbital, clonidine (Captapres), digoxin (Lanoxin), MAO (monoamine oxidase) inhibitors, phenytoin (Dilantin), or selegiline (Eldepryl); or if you have heart disease (especially a recent heart attack) or impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if confusion, dizziness, drowsiness, or blurred vision occurs.
  • Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, drowsiness, fatigue, blurred vision, muscle aches, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: confusion, tremors, abnormally fast or slow heartbeat.

Dicyclomine

  • Generic Name: dicyclomine
  • Uses: Treatment of intestinal cramps and irritable bowel.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take 30 to 60 minutes before eating to obtain best results. Using foods rich in fiber and bran can usually prevent constipation.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are taking sedatives, antacids, antidepressants or major tranquilizers, or if you have glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, prostate gland enlargement, ulcerative colitis or an impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Side Effects: Difficult urination, constipation, headache, drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, skin rash.

Dipentum

  • Generic Name: olsalazine
  • Uses: Treatment of ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and ulcerative proctitis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Should be taken with food in evenly divided doses each day. Keep this and all other medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to olsalazine or sulfasalazine; or if you have chronic liver or renal disease. Exacerbation of systems may occur. There is no known drug-drug interaction.
  • Side Effects: Diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, rash, headache, insomnia, loss of appetite, dyspepsia, and fatigue. Rare of serious reactions: abdominal pain, severe diarrhea, aching joints or muscles.

Disalcid

  • Generic Name: salsalate
  • Uses: Relief of mild to moderate pain of chronic arthritis and related conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best food absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. May have to take with food to prevent stomach upset. Drink full glass of water. Long-term use may result in iron deficiency. Use iron-rich foods.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to aspirin-like drugs, if taking antacids, a blood thinner (anticoagulant), aspirin substitutes, cortisone, Diamox, drugs for diabetes or gout, Methotrexate of large doses of vitamin C, or if you have anemia, a bleeding disorder, peptic ulcer disease or impaired liver or kidneys. Avoid frequent us during pregnancy, avoid completely during last month. Avoid if breast-feeding. Use alcohol cautiously (stomach irritation). Report for tests as directed.
  • Side Effects: Severe stomach pain, vomiting blood, bloody stools. Indigestion, nausea, weakness, ringing in ears, skin rash, hives, itching.

Donnatal

  • Generic Name: belladonna, Phenobarbital
  • Uses: Treatment of intestinal cramps, irritable bowel, or bladder spasm.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take 30 to 60 minutes before eating to obtain best results. Using foods rich in fiber and bran can usually prevent constipation. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are allergic to antispasmodics, or if you are taking MAO inhibitors, sedatives or antidepressants, antacids, antihistamine (Benadryl), cimetidine (Tagamet), prednisone (cortisone), digoxin (Lanoxin), metoclopramide (Reglan), heart rhythm regulators (Pranestyl, Norpace), or thiazide diuretics (Hydrodiuril, Esidix), carbamazepine (Tegretol); antibiotics, phenytoin (Dilantin), or gout medicine (Benemid); or if you have glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, prostate gland enlargement, ulcerative colitis, impaired liver or kidneys, asthma, coronary heart disease, heart failure, uncontrolled high blood pressure, or psychosis. Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision occurs.
  • Side Effects: Headache, drowsiness, dizziness, confusion, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, and skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: difficult urination, constipation.

Doxycycline

  • Generic Name: doxycycline
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. May take with food (not milk) to prevent stomach upset. Drink extra water. Long-term use can result in iron, calcium, and vitamin deficiencies. Use foods rich in iron and calcium and take a multiple vitamin supplement..
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to tetracycline; or if taking antacids, cimetidine (Tagamet), insulin, oral contraceptives, digoxin (Lanoxin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), calcium, iron, barbiturates, phenytoin (Dilantin), Tegretol, or penicillin; or if you have impaired liver function. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Not to be taken by children under 8 years old (may stain teeth). Discard outdated drug. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Discoloration and soreness of tongue, nausea, stomach irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, itching of genital or rectal area. Rare or serious reactions: discoloration of infant's and children's teeth.

Dulcolax

  • Generic Name: bisacodyl
  • Uses: For a short-term treatment of constipation.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take tablet whole. Do not crush. Do not take within one hour of antacids or milk. Keep this and all medicine out of reach of children.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had an allergy or bad reaction to any laxative; or if taking any other drugs; or if you have moderate to severe abdominal pain (intestinal obstruction), recent abdominal surgery, or stool impaction, Diarrhea caused by laxatives can reduce absorption of other medications and reduce their action. Frequent use of laxatives can result in electrolyte imbalance (low blood potassium and sodium) Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, vomiting, stomachache, diarrhea, weakness, dizziness, fainting. Rare or serious reactions: muscle cramps, rectal bleeding, palpitations.

Entolase

  • Generic Name: pancrelipase
  • Uses: Treatment of insufficient or absence of pancreatic enzyme secretion.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: None. Enzymes work best when taken just before, during or immediately after food ingestion. May open capsule and sprinkle over food. Avoid chewing or crushing microbeads.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to any digestive enzymes or pork, or if taking iron or antacids.
  • Side Effects: Stomach cramps, nausea, diarrhea, skin rash, hives.

Feosol

  • Generic Name: ferrous sulfate
  • Uses: Prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on an empty stomach. May have to take with meals to prevent stomach upset. Absorption is enhanced by vitamin C and reduced by dairy products and eggs. Fiber/bran may also reduce absorption but may be helpful to correct constipation. Liquid: Dilute with water and drink through straw into back of mouth to prevent staining of teeth.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had previous side effects from iron, if you are taking antacids or any type of tetracycline, or if you have alcoholism, an active infection, iron-storage disease (Hemochromatosis), liver disease, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer disease. Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. Report for tests as directed.
  • Side Effects: Stomach pain or cramping, bloody stools, heartburn, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, black stools (no significance).

Ferrous Sulfate

  • Generic Name: ferrous sulfate
  • Uses: Prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. May have to take with meals to prevent stomach upset. Absorption is enhanced by Vitamin C and reduced by dairy products and eggs. Fiber/bran may also reduce absorption but may be helpful to correct constipation. Liquid. Dilute with water and drink through straw into back of mouth to prevent staining of teeth.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had previous side effects from iron; or if you are taking antacids, penicillamine (Cupramine, Depen), or any type of tetracycline (Achromycin, Vibramycin); or if you have alcoholism, iron-storage disease (hemochromatosis), liver disease, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer disease, Crohn's disease, or ulcerative colitis. Causes black stools (harmless). Report for tests as directed.
  • Side Effects: Heartburn, nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea and black stools (no significance). Rare or serious reactions: stomach pain or cramping, bloody stools.

Flagyl

  • Generic Name: metronidazole
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food or milk to prevent stomach upset. Use with alcohol may produce headaches, nausea and dizziness. Take full-prescribed course.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are taking Antabuse or a blood thinner (anticoagulant), or if you have a blood cell disorder, epilepsy, or liver disease. Avoid during pregnancy if possible. Avoid if breast-feeding. Do not drive if dizziness occurs. Use Alcohol with extreme caution (possible Antabuse-like reaction).
  • Side Effects: Fever, sore throat, sore mouth or tongue, changes in mood, seizures, numbness or pain in hands or feet. Headache, dizziness, fatigue, unpleasant taste, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea, dark-colored urine (no significance), skin rash, hives or itching.

Floxin

  • Generic Name: ofloxacin
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach. Do not take with food. In particular, do not take within two hours of vitamins with minerals or iron, or with antacids. No interaction with caffeine (coffee, tea, cola and chocolate).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to ofloxacin or other antibiotics; or if taking antacids (Mylanta, Maalox), blood thinners (Coumadin), cyclosporine (Sandimmune), iron (Feosol), probenecid (Benemid), sucralfate (Carafate), theophylline (Theo-Dur), zinc preparations, or methotrexate (Rheumatrex); or if you have severe chronic kidney disease. Stop drug if pain occurs in or around a joint-possible tendon rupture. Do not exercise, contact physician. Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding. Should not be used if under 18 years of age.

Imodium

  • Generic Name: loperamide
  • Uses: Treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola and chocolate) can aggravate diarrhea.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if overly sensitive to sedative drugs, or if you have ulcerative colitis, diarrhea due to the use of antibiotics, or an impaired liver. Do not drive if dizziness or drowsiness occurs. Consult physician if fever or abdominal swelling develops or if diarrhea continues after 2 days of treatment.
  • Side Effects: Fever, abdominal swelling or pain, excessive gas, nausea, vomiting. Dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, constipation, skin rash.

Imuran

  • Generic Name: azathioprine
  • Uses: Prevention of rejection of kidney transplant. Treatment of severe rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk to prevent stomach upset. May decrease appetite.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking aspirin, a blood thinner (anticoagulant), other anti-cancer drugs or Zyloprim, or if you have a history of pancreatitis or impaired liver of kidneys, or have had a recent infection, especially chicken pox or shingles. If pregnant or breast-feeding, get specific advice from physician. Use alcohol very sparingly (risk of stomach bleeding). Report for tests as directed. Inform other physicians and dentist about drug. Consult physician if you develop indications of infection or consider stopping drug.
  • Side Effects: Loss of appetite, lip and mouth sores, joint or muscle pains, loss of hair, skin rash, skin rash, unusual fatigue, weakness. Rare reactions: fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, couch, difficult breathing, severe stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, yellow liver jaundice.

Intron-A

  • Generic Name: interferon alfa-2b
  • Uses: Treatment of chronic hepatitis B and certain forms of leukemia, lymphoma, sarcoma, and cancer.
  • Administration: Given by injection.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: If nausea or vomiting develops, eat dry foods (toast, crackers), soups or unsweetened juices. Eat small meals throughout the day. Avoid sugars, sweets, fried, or fatty foods. There are medications available to treat nausea and vomiting. Drink 2-3 quarts of liquid a day to maintain good urine flow.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to interferon; or if taking aminophylline or zidovudine (Retrovir); or if you have severe chronic kidney or liver disease, cirrhosis of the liver, or heart disease. Report for blood tests as directed. Flu-like symptoms may be prevented by pretreatment with acetaminophen (Tylenol) or aspirin. Use in pregnancy only if benefit outweighs risk. Consult physician. Use effective contraception. Does not reduce risk of sexual transmission of HIV.
  • Side Effects: Fever, fatigue, muscle or joint aches, headache, chills, loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dizziness, cough, loss of hair, rash, dry mouth, itching, change in taste. Rare or serious reactions: depression, confusion, shortness of breath.

Lasix

  • Generic Name: furosemide
  • Uses: Relief of fluid retention (edema). Treatment of high blood pressure.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach for best blood absorption. Best taken in morning to avoid night urination. Drug works best when salt is restricted. May cause excessive loss of potassium in urine. Use foods low in salt (sodium) and high in potassium in urine. Use foods low in salt (sodium) and high in potassium. Use alcohol cautiously (drop in blood pressure).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to diuretics of sulfa drugs; or if taking digoxin (Lanoxin), indomethacin (Indocin), sullindac (Clinoril), warfarin (Coumadin), or lithium (Lithobid); or if you have liver or kidney disease, diabetes, gout, or lupus erythematous. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Consult physician regarding use of salt and potassium.
  • Side Effects: Lightheadedness, fatigue, indigestion, diarrhea, yellow vision, skin rash, hives. Rare or serious reactions: excessive thirst, nausea, vomiting, muscle cramps, irregular heartbeat, joint pain, severe stomach pain, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, yellow liver jaundice.

Levsin

  • Generic Name: L-hyoscyamin
  • Uses: Treatment of intestinal or bladder spasm, peptic ulcer disease, rigidity of Parkinson's disease.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take 30-60 minutes before meals.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking any form of belladonna, antidepressants, a mono-amine oxides (MAO) inhibitor, strong tranquilizers or sedatives, atenolol (Tenormin), digoxin (Lanoxin); or if you have glaucoma, heart disease, hiatal hernia, myasthenia gravis, an enlarged prostate gland or impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if confusion, dizziness, drowsiness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously in hot weather (risk of heat stroke).
  • Side Effects: Agitation or confusion (in elderly), eye pain, dizziness, drowsiness, blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, constipation, difficult urination, skin rash.

Librax

  • Generic Name: chlordiazepoxide
  • Uses: Treatment of irritable bowel and peptic ulcer.
  • Food-Drug Interactions: Take 30 to 60 minutes before eating to obtain best results. Using foods rich in fiber and bran can usually prevent constipation.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to tranquilizers, or if taking sedatives, antidepressants, or a mono-amine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor drug (ask physician); if you have mental depression, glaucoma, heart disease, hiatal hernia, myasthenia gravis, chronic lung disease, prostate gland enlargement, or impaired liver or kidney function. Avoid during first 3 months of pregnancy and while breast-feeding. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation). Report for tests as directed. Consult physician before stopping drug.
  • Side Effects: Depression, eye pain, fever, sore throat, yellow liver jaundice, drowsiness, dizziness, fatigue, blurred vision, dry mouth, nausea, decreased sexual potency.

Lomotil

  • Generic Name: diphenoxylate, atropine
  • Uses: Treatment of acute and chronic diarrhea.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola and chocolate) can aggravate diarrhea. Should not be used in children under 2. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to diphenoxylate or atropine; or if taking sedatives, antidepressants, a mono-amine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor drug, or selegiline (Eldepryl); or if you have glaucoma, myasthenia gravis, chronic lung disease, acute ulcerative colitis, enlarged prostate gland, or impaired liver or kidney function. Prolonged use may cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive if drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision occurs. Prolonged diarrhea or diarrhea occurring after antibiotics requires medical attention.
  • Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, drowsiness, and blurred vision. Dryness of the mouth, difficult urination, skin rash, itching. Rare or serious reactions: stomach pain, constipation, nausea, vomiting.

Maalox

  • Generic Name: magnesium hydroxide, aluminum hydroxide (antacids)
  • Uses: Treatment of stomach hyperacidity, heartburn, peptic ulcer and related peptic acid conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach before eating or 30-60 minutes after eating for most prolonged antacid effect. Do not take with any other medicines as antacids may bind up some drugs and reduce their effectiveness. Separate use by at least one hour.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are taking any other medications, especially Lanoxin (digoxin), tetracycline, Tagamet (cimetidine), steroids, quinidine or Dilantin (phenytoin). Do not take if you have chronic kidney disease (uremia). Avoid long term use except under physician direction. (May result in serious accumulation of aluminum in body.)
  • Side Effects: Diarrhea, abdominal cramping, bloating. Rare or serious reactions: bone pain, fatigue, severe weakness (all rare).

Medrol

  • Generic Name: methylprednisolone
  • Uses: Relief of symptoms in certain allergic and inflammatory conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or without food. A diet low in salt (sodium) and high in potassium and protein is recommended. Long term use may lower bone calcium so calcium rich foods and/or vitamin D/calcium supplements recommended. Use alcohol cautiously (stomach irritation).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had previous side effects from any cortisone drug, if taking aspirin, a blood-thinner (anticoagulant), digitalis, diuretics or anti-diabetic pills; or if you have diabetes, glaucoma, heart disease, or a history or tuberculosis. Avoid during first 3 months of pregnancy and if breast-feeding. With surgery, alert physicians about drug. Consult physician before stopping drug.
  • Side Effects: Weight gain, indigestion, nervousness, acne, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions; mental depression, unusual fatigue or weakness, blurred vision, stomach pain, bloody or black stools, infections, swelling of feet and ankles.

Metamucil

  • Generic Name: psyllium mucilloid
  • Uses: Treatment of chronic constipation, irritable bowel syndrome, diverticulosis, hemorrhoids and some forms of diarrhea.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with a full glass of water at least one hour before or after any medicine (may prevent drug absorption.) The above conditions are often improved when a diet rich in fiber/bran is used.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to stool softeners or bulking agents, have any bowel condition or are taking any medications long term.
  • Side Effects: Severe abdominal pain, vomiting; nausea, mild abdominal cramps, bloating, diarrhea, rumbling sounds.

Metronidazole

  • Generic Name: metronidazole
  • Uses: Treatment and prevention of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food or milk to prevent stomach upset. Use with alcohol may produce headaches, nausea and dizziness. Take full prescribed course.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking a blood thinner (anticoagulant) or Antabuse, or if you have a blood cell or bone marrow disorder, epilepsy or other nervous system disorder, or impaired liver or kidneys. Avoid during the first 3 months of pregnancy if possible and if breast-feeding. Do not drive if dizziness occurs. Avoid alcohol completely. Report for tests as directed.
  • Side Effects: Changes in mood or mental function, unsteadiness, numbness, pain or weakness in hands or feet, seizures, fever, sore throat. Headache, dizziness, fatigue, unpleasant taste, dry mouth, stomach cramps, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark urine (no significance), skin rash, hives, itching.

Mylanta

  • Generic Name: magnesium hydroxide, aluminum hydroxide, simethecone (antacids)
  • Uses: Treatment of stomach hyperacidity, heartburn, peptic ulcer and related peptic acid conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach before eating or 30-60 minutes after eating for most prolonged antacid effect. Do not take with any other medicines antacids may bind up some drugs and reduce their effectiveness. Separate use by at least one hour.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are taking any other medications especially Lanoxin (digoxin), tetracycline, Tagamet (cimetidine), steroids, quinidine, Dilantin (phenytoin) . Do not take if you have chronic kidney disease (uremia). Avoid long term use except under physician direction. (May result in serious accumulation of aluminum in body.)

Pancrease

  • Generic Name: pancrelipase
  • Uses: Treatment of pancreatic enzyme deficiency.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Must be taken just before and/or with food as the drug action is to enhance the digestion and absorption of food and nutrients into the blood.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to pork, or if taking antacids or iron. Consult physician regarding need for adjusting diet.
  • Side Effects: Stomach cramps, nausea, diarrhea, skin rash or hives.

Paxil

  • Generic Name: paroxetine
  • Uses: Treatment of depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and panic attacks.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Usually taken as single dose in morning. May take with food or on an empty stomach. Do not use alcohol while taking this drug. May cause weight loss.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to paroxetine or other antidepressants; or if taking cimetidine (Tagamet), monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors. (Nardil, parnate), Phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), digoxin (Lanoxin), procyclidine (Kemadrin), blood thinners (Coumadin), or over the counter (OTC) drugs; or if you have chronic kidney or liver disease or seizures. Do not take within 14 days of a MAO inhibitor. Extremely serious reaction may occur. Do not drive or engage in hazardous activities until sedative effect is known. Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Headache, abdominal pain, palpitations, nausea, dry mouth, constipation, diarrhea, loss of appetite, sleepiness, insomnia, dizziness, anxiety, sexual dysfunction, sweating, yawning, blurred vision, tingling of skin. Rare or serious reactions: severe weakness.

Pentasa

  • Generic Name: mesalamine
  • Uses: Treatment of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: There are no food-drug interactions. Take one hour before or two hours after meals.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to mesalamine or aspirin; or if you have chronic liver or kidney disease. May be taken with other medications. Effect during pregnancy, breast-feeding or in children is unknown. Discuss with physician.
  • Side Effects: Diarrhea, headache, nausea, indigestion, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, rash. Rare or serious reactions: rectal bleeding, severe abdominal cramps.

Pepcid

  • Generic Name: famotidine
  • Uses: Treatment or prevention of peptic ulcers and related conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food if stomach upset occurs. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola and chocolate) and alcohol stimulate stomach acid production and may worsen ulcer/acid condition.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are allergic to famotidine; or if taking ketoconazole (Nizoral); or if you have a chronic kidney or liver disorder. Do not use for minor digestive symptoms. Consult physician before stopping drug. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, constipation, and diarrhea. Rare or serious reactions: fever, swelling of eyes, chest tightness, unusual bleeding, and unusual weakness.

Percocet

  • Generic Name: acetaminophen oxycodone
  • Uses: Relief of moderate to severe pain.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: For best blood absorption, take on an empty stomach. May take with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Use alcohol with extreme caution and avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are overly sensitive to sedative drugs; or if you are taking any other drug; or if you have lung, liver, gall bladder, or kidney disease, asthma, or an enlarged prostate gland. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive or operate machinery if drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion occurs. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use.
  • Side Effects: Lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, difficult urination, itching, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions; difficult breathing, yellow liver jaundice, unusual weakness, fever, sore throat, bleeding or bruising.

Peri-Colace

  • Generic Name: docusate, casanthranol
  • Uses: Short-term treatment of constipation.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with a full glass of water at least one hour before or after any medicine. Laxative use should be temporary. Prolonged use may result in bowel dependence. Frequent use can cause muscle cramps or weakness.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have had a reaction to stool softeners, bulking agents, or laxatives; or if you have any bowel condition; or if you are taking any medications long term. Keep this and all medications out of reach of children. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Nausea, mild abdominal cramps, bloating, diarrhea, rumbling sounds. Rare or serious reactions: severe abdominal pain, vomiting.

Premarin

  • Generic Name: conjugated estrogens
  • Uses: Treatment of menopausal symptoms and related conditions; prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Avoid excessive salt (sodium) intake as fluid retention or edema can occur. Long-term use may result in vitamin deficiencies. Use a daily multiple vitamin supplement.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic to estrogen; or if taking antibiotics (penicillin), blood thinners (Coumadin), Phenobarbital, carbamazepine (Tegretal), antidepressant drugs, (Elavil), phenytoin (Dilantin), or rifampin; or if you have had cancer of the breast or uterus (present or past), abnormal vaginal bleeding, thrombophlebitis, migraine headaches, epilepsy, gall bladder disease, high blood pressure, fibroid tumors in the uterus, breast problems, or stroke. May alter blood sugar control in diabetics.
  • Side Effects: Dizziness, nausea, vomiting, swelling of feet and ankles, breast tenderness, brown spots on skin, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: abnormal vaginal bleeding, severe headache, sudden weakness or paralysis, sudden change in vision or speech, sudden pain in chest, difficult breathing, pain or swelling in leg, yellow liver jaundice.

Prevacid

  • Generic Name: lansoprazole
  • Uses: Treatment of severe reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus, reflux esophagitis, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome peptic ulcers, and other severe stomach acid conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Usually taken before meals. Swallow capsule whole or may sprinkle on tablespoon of applesauce. Swallow immediately without chewing or crushing. Avoid nicotine, caffeine, and alcohol; they can aggravate acid induced conditions.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to Iansoprazole; or if taking theophylline (Theo-Dur), sucralfate (Carafate), ampicillin (Omnipen), iron (Feosol), ketoconazole (Nizoral), digoxin (Lanoxin); or if you have chronic kidney or liver disease. Restrict maximum use of acetaminophen (Tylenol), particularly with alcohol use. Severe liver damage may occur. Long-term use may require regular blood tests. Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Headache, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, rash, cough, and weakness.

Prilosec

  • Generic Name: omeprazole
  • Uses: Treatment of severe reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus reflux esophagitis, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, and other severe stomach acid conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Usually taken before meals. Swallow capsule whole. Do not open or crush. Antacids may be used. Avoid charbroiled foods and cigarette smoking while taking this medication.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you have any allergies; or if you are taking diazepam (Valium), phenytoin (Dilantin), ampicillin (Omnipen), iron (Feosol), ketoconazole (Nizoril), or blood thinners (Coumadin); or if you have chronic liver or kidney disease. Restrict maximum use of acetaminophen (Tylenol), particularly with moderate alcohol consumption (severe liver damage may occur). Long-term use may require regular stomach evaluation.
  • Side Effects: Headache, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal discomfort, nausea, vomiting, rash, cough, and weakness.

Procardia

  • Generic Name: nifedipine
  • Uses: Long-term treatment of chronic angina heart pain. (Not for relief of acute angina attack.) Treatment of high blood pressure.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Abrupt drop in blood pressure (dizziness) can usually be avoided if pill is taken with food. If edema or swelling occurs, follow a salt (sodium) restricted diet. Use alcohol cautiously (drop in blood pressure). With the XL doses it is normal for the used tablet shell to come through in the stool.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to calcium blockers; or if taking a beta-blocker (Inderal), cimetidine (Tagamet), digoxin (Lanoxin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), blood thinners (Coumadin), or quinidine ( Quinaglute); or if you have low blood pressure, aortic stenosis, heart conditions, impaired liver or kidneys, or heart failure. Do not drive if drowsiness or dizziness occurs. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity).
  • Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, constipations, joint pains, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: irregular or abnormally slow heartbeat, fainting, swelling of feet and ankles, yellow liver jaundice (very rare).

Prozac

  • Generic Name: fluoxetine
  • Uses: Treatment of depression and bulimia
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk to prevent stomach upset. Initially take in morning or as directed by physician. May require 2 to 4 weeks to obtain full effect of drug. May cause loss of appetite. Avoid use of alcohol.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to fluoxetine or antidepressants: or if taking phenytoin (Dilantin), benzodiazepines(Valium), desipramine (Norparamin), monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors, (Nardil, Parnate), digoxin (Lanoxin), selegiline (Eldepryl), or blood thinners (Coumadin); or if you have drug abuse, previous electroshock therapy, chronic kidney or liver disease, or have attempted suicide. Do not drive or operate hazardous machinery if drowsiness, dizziness, or blurred vision occurs. Initial weight loss in underweight people may occur.
  • Side Effects: headache, nervousness, insomnia, drowsiness, anxiety, tremors, dizziness, fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, loss of appetite, indigestion, constipation, sweating. Rare or serious reactions: weight loss, rash, joint pain.

Purinethol

  • Generic Name: mercaptopurine
  • Uses: Treatment of acute and chronic leukemia, and certain types of intestinal conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. May decrease appetite. Maintain good urine flow by drinking 3 quarts of liquid daily. Long-term use may cause vitamin B3 (Niacin) deficiency. Use multiple vitamins. Use alcohol very sparingly (risk of stomach bleeding)
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to mercaptopurine; or if taking aspirin, a blood thinner (Coumadin), other anti-cancer drugs, or allopurinol (Zyloprim); or if you have gout, kidney stones, impaired liver or kidney function, or have had a recent infection, especially chicken pox or shingles. Consult physician if you develop indications of infection.
  • Side Effects: Loss of appetite, sore mouth, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dark discoloration of skin, itching, rash. Rare or serious reactions: unusual fatigue, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, bloody stools, kidney pain, joint swelling and pain, yellow liver jaundice.

Questran

  • Generic Name: cholestyramine
  • Uses: Reduction of high blood cholesterol. Correction of certain intestinal conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Mix with liquid or pulpy fruit. May take on empty stomach or with meals. Do not take with other medicines as drug may render them ineffective. Long-term use may lower levels of fat-soluble vitamins in body-Vitamins A, D, and K. Use foods high in these vitamins or a multiple vitamin supplement.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking any other drug, especially a blood thinner (Coumadin), cordarone, prednisone (Cortisone), digoxin (Lanoxin), arthritis pills, diuretics, Actigall or thyroid; or if you have a bleeding disorder, constipation, gallstones, active liver disease, peptic ulcer disease, intestinal disorder or impaired kidneys. Consult physician regarding use of any other drug.
  • Side Effects: Indigestion, bloating, diarrhea. Constipation, severe stomach pain, nausea, vomiting, black stools, loss of weight.

Reglan

  • Generic Name: metoclopramide
  • Uses: Treatment of esophagitis, sluggish gastrointestinal system and nausea and vomiting.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best taken thirty minutes before eating. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation). Keep this and all medications out of reach of children.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to metoclopramide: or if taking any form of belladonna (antispasmodic), sedatives or strong tranquilizers, acetaminophen (Tylenol), cimetidine (Tagamet), digoxin (Lanoxin), promethazine (Phenergan), or tetracycline (Achromycin); or if you have epilepsy. Parkinson's disease, a pheochromocytoma, impaired liver or kidneys, breast cancer, or diabetes. Do not drive if dizziness, drowsiness or confusion occurs. If pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding, ask medical advice regarding this medication.
  • Side Effects: Headache, dizziness, fatigue, nervousness, insomnia, dry mouth, breast soreness and swelling, nausea, constipation, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: confusion, drowsiness, jerky movements of face or head, muscle spasms, tremors.

Rowasa

  • Generic Name: mesalamine
  • Uses: Treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative proctitis, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's colitis).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are allergic to sulfites or mesalamine (5-amino-salicylate), if taking sulfasalazine or if you have chronic kidney disease.
  • Side Effects: Acute abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, fever; headache, flu, flatus, anal pain, mild hair loss.

Sulfasalazine

  • Generic Name: csulfasalazine
  • Uses: Treatment of Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take with food/milk to prevent stomach upset or loss of appetite. May take on empty stomach. Maintain good urine flow by drinking two quarts of liquid daily. Long-term use lowers blood folic acid (folacen) level. Use foods rich in folic acid or vitamin supplement.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to aspirin or "sulfa" drugs, if taking a blood thinner (anticoagulant), pills for diabetes, Dilantin, digoxin, Mandelamine or methotrexate, or if you have a blood sell disorder, porphyria or impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if dizziness occurs. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Report for tests as directed. With surgery, alert physician about drug.
  • Side Effects: Severe skin reaction, joint or muscle pains, bloody urine, reduced sperm count, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, yellow liver jaundice. Headache, dizziness, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, rash, orange coloration of urine (no significance).

Synthroid

  • Generic Name: levothyroxine
  • Uses: Treatment of thyroid hormone deficiency, simple goiter or thyroid cancer.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach one hour before or two hours after eating. Take as single dose before breakfast. Excessive ingestion of soybeans or soybean products can decrease thyroid function.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic to thyroid hormone; or if taking blood thinners (Coumadin), cholestyramine (Questran), digoxin (Lanoxin), estrogens (Premarin), or antidepressant drugs (Elavil); or if you have Addison's disease, adrenal hormone deficiency, diabetes, heart disease, or high blood pressure. Consult your physician before stopping this drug. Should not be used to treat obesity. Consult physician if breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Intolerance to heat, unusual sweating, hand tremor, weight loss, skin rash or hives, changes in menstrual pattern. Rare or serious reactions: headache, nervousness, insomnia, rapid or irregular heartbeat.

Tagamet

  • Generic Name: cimetidine
  • Uses: Treatment of peptic ulcer and related conditions
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or following food/milk. Do not take with antacids. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate) and alcohol stimulate stomach acid production and may worsen ulcer/acid condition.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if you are allergic to cimetidine; or if taking alcohol, alprazolam (Xanax), antacids, carbamazepine (Tegretol), sedatives or anti-depressants, digoxin (Lanoxin), beta-blockers (Inderal, Lopressor), nifedipine (Procardia), phenytoin (Dilantin), diabetic agents, blood thinners (Coumadin), or theophylline (Theo-Dur); or if you have impaired kidney function or lupus erythematous. Do not drive or engage in hazardous activities if dizziness or mental confusion occurs.
  • Side Effects: skin rash, headache, dizziness, diarrhea, muscular pains, hair loss, breast swelling and soreness in men, reduced sexual potency, reduced sperm count. Rare or serious reactions: mental confusion (more common in elderly), unusual fatigue, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising.
  • Note: Chek-Med Cards do not cover all uses, cautions or side effects. See your physician or pharmacist for additional information.

Tetracycline

  • Generic Name: tetracycline
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. May take with food (not milk) to prevent stomach upset. Drink extra water. Long-term use can result in iron, calcium, and vitamin deficiencies. Use foods rich in iron and calcium and take a multiple vitamin supplement.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to tetracycline; or if taking antacids, cimetidine (Tagamet), insulin, oral contraceptives, digoxin (Lanoxin), theophylline (Theo-Dur), calcium, iron, and any kind of penicillin; or if you have chronic kidney or liver disease. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Not to be taken by children under 8 years of age (may stain teeth). Discard outdated drug. Advise physician if pregnant, planning pregnancy, or breast-feeding.
  • Side Effects: Discoloration and soreness of tongue, nausea, stomach irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, itching of genital or rectal area, rash.

Tigan

  • Generic Name: trimethobenzamide
  • Uses: Control of nausea and vomiting.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk. Use suppository as directed.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to benzocaine (if suppositories are prescribed), if taking sedatives, or if you have high fever, stomach cramps or diarrhea. DO NOT GIVE TO CHILDREN WHO HAVE ACUTE VIRUS INFECTION (POSSIBLE REYE'S SYNDROME). Avoid during first 3 months of pregnancy. DO NOT DRIVE if drowsiness, dizziness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Side Effects: SEVERE MUSCLE SPASMS, CONVULSIONS, TREMORS, MENTAL DEPRESSION, UNUSUAL FATIGUE, FEVER, SORE THROAT, YELLOW LIVER JAUNDICE. Drowsiness, dizziness, blurred vision, headache, diarrhea.

Tylenol

  • Generic Name: acetaminophen
  • Uses: Relief of mild to moderate pain.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Take on empty stomach for best blood absorption. Large mega-doses of vitamin C cause excessive toxic buildup of drug. Avoid!
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking a blood thinner (anticoagulant), other sedatives or anti-seizure drugs; or if you have a history of alcoholism, liver disease or impaired kidneys. Use alcohol cautiously (liver injury). Report for tests as directed. In case of overdose, contact physician immediately. Prompt medical attention is critical, even if there are no symptoms. (Overdose may cause severe liver damage.)
  • Side Effects: Skin rash, hives, itching. Rare or serious reactions: decreased urine volume, difficult urination, bloody urine, weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, yellow liver jaundice.

Tylenol with Codeine

  • Generic Name: acetaminophen, codeine
  • Uses: Relief of moderate to severe pain.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: For best blood absorption, take on an empty stomach. May take with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are overly sensitive to acetaminophen or codeine; or if you are taking any other drug; or if you have lung, liver, gall bladder, or kidney disease, asthma, or an enlarged prostate gland. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive or operate machinery if drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion occurs. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use. Use alcohol with extreme caution and avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Side Effects: Lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, difficult urination, itching, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: difficult breathing, yellow liver jaundice, unusual weakness, fever, sore throat, bleeding or bruising.

Ultram

  • Generic Name: tramadol
  • Uses: Treatment of moderate to severe pain.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take on empty stomach or with food/milk to prevent stomach upset. Use alcohol with caution (increased sedation).
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to tramadol; or if taking carbamazepine (Tegretol), monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors (Nardil, Parnate), or quinidine (Quinaglute); or if you have chronic kidney or liver disease, convulsions, seizures, or epilepsy. Use in pregnancy only if benefit outweighs risk. Consult physician. Use effective contraception. Do not drive or engage in hazardous activities until effect of drug is known. Avoid long-term use (may cause addiction).
  • Side Effects: Itching, sweating, dry mouth, constipation, diarrhea, nausea, stomach pain, dizziness, drowsiness, nervousness, tremors, anxiety. Rare or serious reactions: hallucinations.

Urecholine

  • Generic Name: bethanechol
  • Uses: Treatment of esophagitis. Gastro-intestinal and urinary bladder stimulant.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Should take on empty stomach one or one and a half hours before eating to obtain full effect of drug.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if taking drugs for high blood pressure, Procan, Pronestyl or quinidine, or if you have angina, asthma, epilepsy, high blood pressure, peptic ulcer disease or over active thyroid gland. DO NOT DRIVE if dizziness, faintness or blurred vision occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (drop in blood pressure).
  • Side Effects: DIFFICULT BREATHING, WHEEZING (ASTHMA), CHEST TIGHTNESS OR PAIN. Headache, dizziness, faintness, flushing, blurred vision nausea, vomiting, stomach cramps, diarrhea, and bladder urgency.

Valium

  • Generic Name: diazepam
  • Uses: Relief of anxiety, nervous tension, muscle spasm, and acute agitation.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Drug may increase appetite. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) decreases sedative effect. Do not take with antacids. Avoid prolonged uninterrupted use. Use alcohol with extreme caution: avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic to diazepam; or if you take carbamazepine (Tegretol), cimetidine (Tagamet), oral contraceptives, digoxin (Lanoxin), erythromycin (EES), levodopa (Larodopa, metoprolol (Lopressor), phenytoin (Dilantin), propoxyphene (Darvon), propranolol uninterrupted use. Use alcohol with extreme caution: avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Side Effects: headache, dizziness, drowsiness, unsteadiness, weakness, blurred vision, nausea, constipation, skin rash, itching. Rare or serious reactions: unusual excitement or agitation, confusion, hallucinations, depression.

Vibramycin/Vibratab

  • Generic Name: doxycycline
  • Uses: Treatment of certain infections.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: Best blood absorption occurs when taken on empty stomach. May take with food (not milk) to prevent stomach upset. Drink extra water. Long-term use can result in iron, calcium and vitamin deficiencies. Use foods rich in iron and calcium and take multiple vitamin supplements.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to tetracycline or if taking antacids, oral contraceptives, digoxin (Lanoxin), theophylline (TheoDur), calcium, iron, barbiturates, Dilantin, Tegretol; or penicillin; or if you have impaired liver function. Avoid during last half of pregnancy and while breast feeding. Avoid excessive sun (skin sensitivity). Not to be taken by children under 8 years old. Discard outdated drug.
  • Side Effects: Discoloration of infant and children's teeth. Discoloration and soreness of tongue, nausea, stomach irritation, vomiting, diarrhea, itching of genital or rectal area.

Vicodin

  • Generic Name: acetaminophen, hydrocodone
  • Uses: Relief of moderate to severe pain.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: For best blood absorption, take on an empty stomach. May take with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use. Use alcohol with extreme caution and avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are overly sensitive to sedative drugs; or if you are taking any other drug; or if you have lung, liver, gall bladder, or kidney disease, asthma, or an enlarged prostate gland. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive or operate machinery if drowsiness, dizziness, or confusion occurs. Avoid prolonged and uninterrupted use.
  • Side Effects: lightheadedness, dizziness, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, constipation, difficult urination, itching, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: difficult breathing, yellow liver jaundice, unusual weakness, fever, sore throat, bleeding or bruising.

Vistaril

  • Generic Name: hydroxyzine
  • Uses: Relief of anxiety, nervous tension and itching.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with food or on empty stomach. Caffeine may decrease sedative effect. Liquid: shake well. Avoid prolonged uninterrupted use.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if overly sensitive to sedative drugs, or if taking other sedatives or antidepressant drugs. Avoid during first 3 months of pregnancy and if breast feeding. DO NOT DRIVE if drowsiness occurs. Use alcohol cautiously (excessive sedation).
  • Side Effects: Drowsiness, dry mouth, skin rash. RARE REACTIONS: SHAKINESS, CONVULSIONS.

Xanax

  • Generic Name: alprazolam
  • Uses: Relief of anxiety, nervous tension and panic disorder.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with food/milk if stomach upset occurs. Drug may increase appetite. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) decreases sedative effect. Do not take with antacids. Avoid prolonged uninterrupted use. Use alcohol with extreme caution: avoid it completely if it is necessary to drive.
  • Cautions: Inform your physician if you are allergic to alprazolam; or if you take carbamazepine (Tegretol), cimetidine (Tagamet), oral contraceptives, digoxin (Lanoxin), erythromycin (EES), levodopa (Larodopa), metoprolol (Lopressor), phenytoin (Dilantin), propoxyphene (Darvon), propranolol (Inderal), ranitidine (Zantac), or valproic acid (Depakene): or if you have glaucoma, severe depression, drug or alcohol addiction, or kidney or liver disease. Prolonged use can cause dependence (addiction). Do not drive if dizziness, drowsiness, or blurred vision occurs.
  • Side Effects: headache, dizziness, drowsiness, unsteadiness, weakness, blurred vision, nausea, constipation, skin rash, itching. Rare or serious reactions: unusual excitement or agitation, confusion, hallucinations, depression.

Zantac

  • Generic Name: ranitidine
  • Uses: Treatment of peptic ulcer and related conditions.
  • Food-Drug Interaction: May take with or following food/milk. Do not take with antacids. Caffeine (coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) and alcohol stimulate stomach acid production and may worsen ulcer/acid condition.
  • Cautions: Inform physician if allergic to ranitidine; or if taking antacids, chlordiazepoxide (Librium), diazepam (Valium), Flurazepam (Dalmane). Glipizide (Glucotrol), procainamide (Pronestyl), triazolam (Halcion), or blood thinners (Coumadin); or if you have impaired liver or kidneys. Do not drive if dizziness occurs. Consult physician before stopping drug. Do not use this drug for minor digestive upsets.
  • Side Effects: headache, dizziness, nausea, stomach pain, constipation, skin rash. Rare or serious reactions: weakness, fever, sore throat, abnormal bleeding or bruising, yellow liver jaundice.

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